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Partnership fuels new training for trades and technology teachers

A new collaboration between Okanagan College and Brock University is opening doors for those looking to teach trades and technology. 

The Trades and Technology Teacher Education (TTTE) program will come online this September. The program will offer existing high school teachers a means to specialize in trades and technology, while also giving tradespeople and technology professionals a chance to add instructional training to their toolkit.
  
“The beauty of the TTTE program is that it opens up convenient pathways to teaching trades and technology for people from many different backgrounds,” notes Steve Moores, Dean of Trades and Apprenticeship at Okanagan College.
  
The program is comprised of online courses in communications, digital media, educational pedagogies, curriculum design and evaluation, conflict management, math for trades and technology, electronics, robotics, drafting and design. Summer sessions at the College’s Kelowna campus will help students gain practical shop experience, safety training, and knowledge of applied pedagogies.

Each student’s path through the program will depend on their previous education and training. 

Secondary school teachers can complete the TTTE Certificate and qualify to teach carpentry, electrical, metalwork, heavy mechanics, power mechanics, auto mechanics, robotics, electronics, drafting and design. 

Tradespersons with a Red Seal and industry experience can complete the TTTE Diploma and apply to instruct trades programs in their industry. Okanagan College will accept the TTTE Diploma as qualifying training for OC trades instructors with a Red Seal and industry experience. 

Students pursuing the TTTE Certificate will enroll with the College, while those looking to complete the Diploma will register with both OC and Brock University. Students who complete the Diploma may then apply the credits toward the three-year online Brock University Bachelor of Education in Adult Education. 

“We’re excited to work with Okanagan College,” says Robert McGray, Associate Professor and Program Director of the Adult Education programs in Brock University’s Faculty of Education. “We share OC’s commitment to equipping educators with the skills and knowledge they need, whether they’re new educators of adults or experienced teachers in high schools.” 

Providing students entering the program from different fields with just the right blend of instructional and hands-on trades training was one of the challenges of bringing the TTTE program to life. Collaboration proved to be the solution. 

“We wanted to ensure students could access training that is convenient for their lives and busy schedules – hence the online component – while also making sure those students get the hands-on skills they’ll need to be successful teaching a wide array of tools, techniques and technologies,” explains Moores. “Tapping into Brock University’s adult education teacher training curriculum provided the perfect means to augment the trades and technology training students will receive in person at OC.” 

The TTTE program isn’t just for those looking to teach adults. A pending partnership between the College and UBC Okanagan School of Education is also expected to create a new pathway for students looking to teach trades and technology at the high school level. The College consulted with school districts in the region both to gauge the need for the training, as well as identify the means of delivery that would work best for teachers. Local educators are already showing interest in the program.

“We’re seeing applications and fielding questions from students from a variety of different backgrounds and industries – including a number of local secondary school teachers,” explains Sara Cousins, the program’s administrator. “We’re looking forward to working with them all and our hope is that the program will provide a new and welcome means of professional development for teachers and tradespeople alike.” More information about the program is available at okanagan.bc.ca/ttte.

Original article from Okanagan College